Youth, Education & Technology News : March 2009

Recent Entries
YL NewsBlog Home

Recent March 2009
+ Playful Pinwheels
+ In Which Direction Is My Collection? - A YouthLearn Photo Editing and Web Design Project
+ Six technologies soon to affect education
+ Social Skills, Extracurricular Activities In High School Pay Off
+ Music Videos Help Educators and Students Conquer Copyright Confusion

Category Archives
Activities [140]
Funding [185]
News [136]
Research [94]
Resources [191]
YouthLearn Updates [44]
Archives By Date
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
Search the NewsBlog
More YouthLearn




 
 
Powered by
Movable Type 2.661

March 31, 2009

Playful Pinwheels

In honor of the long-awaited arrival of spring and Earth Day, coming up on April 22, try this arts and crafts activity with your group. Making your own pinwheels is a fun way to inspire discussion around wind energy and renewable resources.

URL: http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/03/lp305-01.shtml
Posted by wrivenburgh on March 31, 2009 | Activities

In Which Direction Is My Collection? - A YouthLearn Photo Editing and Web Design Project

A collection is more than simply a set of objects; the relationships among the objects tell a story. A story about a collection could be about things in your room, people in your community, hip-hop slang or ways to give directions. Because almost anything can fit into a collection, projects focusing on collections give you the flexibility to reinforce curriculum goals ranging from vocabulary, math, and science to art and technology.

In this project, kids decide on a topic, create or assemble a collection of information or items related to that topic, and build a Web page to show off the collection.

This example incorporates digital photography and photo editing to create a collection of imaginary road signs to reinforce vocabulary building and synonyms. Don't limit yourself to our topic, however. You can do the project with text alone, replace the photography module with one on computer drawing, or create a multimedia presentation as the end product instead of a Web page.

URL: http://www.youthlearn.org/learning/activities/multimedia/collection.asp
Posted by wrivenburgh on March 31, 2009 | Activities

Six technologies soon to affect education

"Collaborative environments, cloud computing, and 'smart' objects are among the technologies that a group of experts believes will have a profound impact on K-12 education within the next five years or sooner.

The group, called the New Media Consortium (NMC), has come out with an annual report on emerging technologies in higher education for the last several years. This year, for the first time, NMC has issued a K-12 version of its 'Horizon Report' as well....

The six technologies detailed in the report are...

- One year or less: collaborative environments and online communication tools
- Two to three years: mobile devices and cloud computing
- Four to five years: smart objects and the personal web"

URL: http://www.eschoolnews.com/news/top-news/?i=57910
Posted by wrivenburgh on March 31, 2009 | News

Social Skills, Extracurricular Activities In High School Pay Off

"It turns out that being voted 'Most likely to succeed' in high school might actually be a good predictor of one’s financial and educational success later in life.

According to a University of Illinois professor who studies the sociology of education, high school sophomores who were rated by their teachers as having good social skills and work habits, and who participated in extracurricular activities in high school, made more money and completed higher levels of education 10 years later than their classmates who had similar standardized test scores but were less socially adroit and participated in fewer extracurricular activities.

Christy Lleras, a professor of human and community development, says that soft skills' such as sociability, punctuality, conscientiousness and an ability to get along well with others, along with participation in extracurricular activities, are better predictors of earnings and higher educational achievement later in life than having good grades and high standardized test scores."

URL: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090325132536.htm
Posted by wrivenburgh on March 31, 2009 | Research

Music Videos Help Educators and Students Conquer Copyright Confusion

"Can an animated little bird and a skater girl help young people learn about the concept of intellectual property? Can a 'Schoolhouse Rock' style music video help people appreciate their social responsibilities and rights under copyright law?

Researchers at Temple University's Media Education Lab have created two animated music videos to clarify the purpose of copyright and the doctrine of fair use. Catchy lyrics and clever visuals help people understand how 'context and situation determine how fair use applies' to the use of copyrighted materials. A solid understanding of copyright and fair use is especially important for the use of remix practices that are now common on You Tube, MySpace and other social networking sites. That's why they've posted their music videos to You Tube."

URL: http://www.mediaeducationlab.com/news/music-videos-help-educators-and-students-conquer-copyright-confusion
Posted by wrivenburgh on March 31, 2009 | Resources

ESA Foundation Offers Funding for Youth Programs

"The ESA (Entertainment Software Association) Foundation is dedicated to supporting positive programs and opportunities that make a difference in the quality of life, health, and welfare of America's youth. The foundation seeks to harness the collective power of the interactive entertainment industry to create positive social impact in our communities. The foundation supports geographically diverse projects and programs that benefit American youth of all races and denominations and both genders.

Applicant organizations must have tax-exempt 501(c)(3) status and must be seeking funding for a specific project or program that is or will be conducted in two or more states in the United States and serves youths between the ages of 7 and 18. Applicant organizations must provide youth programs in one or more of the following areas: skills and personal development, general health and welfare, risk behavior prevention, education, or multimedia arts/technology."

Deadline: April 15, 2009.

URL:http://www.theesa.com/foundation/application.asp
Referred by: Foundation Center
Posted by wrivenburgh on March 31, 2009 | Funding

Open Society Institute Seeks Proposals for Documentary Photography Distribution Grants

"The Open Society Institute Documentary Photography Project is offering a grant to documentary photographers who have already completed a significant body of work on issues of social justice, to collaborate with a partner organization and propose new ways of using photography as a tool for positive social change.

All applicant photographers must work with another entity (such as a nonprofit, NGO, or community-based organization) to design an innovative distribution strategy that targets specific communities and advocates for social change.

The program will award grants of $5,000 to $30,000 each.

For further information, see the Distribution Grant guidelines at the OSI Web site."

Deadline: June 19, 2009.

URL: http://www.soros.org/initiatives/photography/news/distribution2009_20081125
Referred by: Foundation Center
Posted by wrivenburgh on March 31, 2009 | Funding

March 17, 2009

March is Women's History Month

"The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of women whose commitment to nature and the planet have proved invaluable to society."

Features include images, audio/video, profiles, and resources for teachers. How will you celebrate women's history this month?

URL: http://womenshistorymonth.gov/index.html
Posted by wrivenburgh on March 17, 2009 | News

Keeping Kids in School

The America's Promise Alliance has released its updated edition of Grad Nation, a comprehensive guidebook with supporting tools on the best evidence-based practices on keeping students in school, graduating and prepared for college.

URL: http://www.americaspromise.org/APAPage.aspx?id=11796
Referred by: Connect for Kids
Posted by wrivenburgh on March 17, 2009 | Resources

Selecting, Training, and Coaching Out-of-School Time Staff

"Research on successful out-of-school time programs repeatedly has found that the caliber of a program's staff is a critical feature of high-quality programs that achieve positive outcomes. Three new Child Trends briefs present findings and effective strategies for selecting, training, and coaching frontline staff in the effective implementation of out-of-school time programs."

The research briefs are as follows:

Staff Selection: What's Important for Out-Of-School Time Programs?

Training Out-Of-School Time Staff

Using Coaching to Provide Ongoing Support and Supervision to Out-Of-School Time Staff

URL: http://childtrends.org/_docdisp_page.cfm?LID=05D17514-9153-4C82-86C75FC4B61FDEB5
Posted by wrivenburgh on March 17, 2009 | Research

BBC Blast Film Tips and Tools

Designed for young people, this BBC portal offers a wealth of resources on filmmaking. The Tips and Tools page includes interactive filming tools, tips on turning ideas into movies, and more information about careers and education, genres, equipment, and techniques. Note that there's a number of links to external content. Young people can also view galleries of youth media, and upload their own films. Other BBC Blast Tips and Tools sites include Art and Design, Music, Writing, Games, and Fashion.

URL: http://www.bbc.co.uk/blast/film/tipsandtools/
Posted by wrivenburgh on March 17, 2009 | Resources

You Oughta Be in Pictures: YouthLearn's Intro to Making Videos

Video can be one of the most powerful forms of communication, and it offers a tremendous vehicle for learning. Experiencing video production, even in its most basic form, can open new career opportunities and avenues for personal expression. It teaches kids about multimedia communication with action and motion, and it helps them reinforce a variety of other skills, including critical thinking, literacy, interpersonal communication, collaboration, public speaking, composition, storytelling and group decision making.

Working with video isn't something you can just jump right into, however. Children must be prepared for it with preliminary excursions into concepts like storyboarding and photography. Each stage can be made fun and educational, and at the end of the project, the children will understand how all the pieces come together to make a video they're proud to show parents, friends and the world by putting it on the Internet. Children as young as age five can make a video with the proper guidance and preparation.

URL: http://www.youthlearn.org/learning/activities/multimedia/video.asp
Posted by wrivenburgh on March 17, 2009 | Activities

Request for Submissions from Student Filmmakers

"The Teacher Salary Project is inviting all Americans to help build a movement to honor teachers.

We are excited to announce an expansion of our endeavor! We know that students are the true experts about the teachers who have the greatest impact on their lives. In this spirit, we are inviting students to use their creativity and submit first-hand stories about their teachers. All types of submissions are welcome—write a letter telling us about a teacher’s impact and why they should be valued more than they are, put together 'a day in the life' footage, film commercials about a favorite teacher, or do something else that we haven’t even though of.

While we certainly still want home videos from teachers as well, we know that by broadening the scope of the stories and perspectives we receive, we will be able to create an even stronger community-built movement. This movement will tell the true stories of hardworking teachers in order to change the public perception, support, and financial rewards that accompany the invaluable work of teaching. To learn more about submitting stories to us, go to our student submissions web page or email us at vanessa@theteachersalaryproject.org."

URL: http://www.theteachersalaryproject.org/studentvideo.html
Posted by wrivenburgh on March 17, 2009 | Activities