Youth, Education & Technology News

Recent Entries
YL NewsBlog Home
Category Archives
Activities [140]
Funding [185]
News [136]
Research [94]
Resources [191]
YouthLearn Updates [44]
Archives By Date
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
Search the NewsBlog
More YouthLearn




 
 
Powered by
Movable Type 2.661

Resources,  September 30, 2008

Assessing What Kids Think About Themselves

"Children in the United States tend to experience a decline in positive self-concept during their adolescent years. This decline often begins around age 12 for girls and around age 14 for boys. For some, the decline can become severe in early adolescence (between the ages 14 and 16) before generally recovering
in the mid-teen years.1 Having a negative selfconcept during adolescence has been associated with maladaptive behaviors and emotions. In contrast, having a positive self-concept has been linked to positive social and emotional development. This brief discusses child and adolescent self-concept and provides
information for out-of-school time program practitioners on how to assess self-concept among program participants. The brief also suggests ways that program practitioners can foster positive self-concept in adolescents."

URL: http://www.childtrends.org/Files//Child_Trends-2008_08_20_RB_SelfConcept.pdf
Posted by wrivenburgh on September 30, 2008 | Resources
Comments