Youth, Education & Technology News

Recent Entries
YL NewsBlog Home
Category Archives
Activities [140]
Funding [185]
News [136]
Research [94]
Resources [191]
YouthLearn Updates [44]
Archives By Date
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
Search the NewsBlog
More YouthLearn




 
 
Powered by
Movable Type 2.661

News,  July 07, 2008

Technology Reshapes America's Classrooms

The "Lilla G. Frederick Pilot Middle School in Boston, offers a glimpse into the future.

It has no textbooks. Students receive laptops at the start of each day, returning them at the end. Teachers and students maintain blogs. Staff and parents chat on instant messaging software. Assignments are submitted through electronic 'drop boxes' on the school's Web site....

The experiment at Frederick began two years ago at cost of about $2 million, but last year was the first in which all 7th and 8th grade students received laptops. Classwork is done in Google Inc's free applications like Google Docs, or Apple's iMovie and specialized educational software like FASTT Math.

'Why would we ever buy a book when we can buy a computer? Textbooks are often obsolete before they are even printed,' said Debra Socia, principal of the school in Dorchester, a tough Boston district prone to crime and poor schools....

'It's a powerful, powerful experience,' added Socia. Average attendance climbed to 94 percent from 92 percent; discipline referrals fell 30 percent. And parents are more engaged, she said....

Unlike traditional schools, Frederick's students work at vastly different levels in the same classroom. Children with special needs rub shoulders with high performers. Computers track a range of aptitude levels, allowing teachers to tailor their teaching to their students' weakest areas, Socia said."

URL: http://news.yahoo.com/i/1212;_ylt=AkG3lA95XeuqQm5T0xb9QPojtBAF
Posted by wrivenburgh on July 07, 2008 | News
Comments