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Research,  August 07, 2007

Low-income Children Need Summer Learning, Study Finds

"New research underscores the importance of the summer learning programs that many afterschool programs organize and run. In 'Lasting Consequences of the Summer Learning Gap,' released this spring, Johns Hopkins University sociologists Karl Alexander, Doris Entwisle and Linda Steffel Olson find that the difference in children’s academic success can be explained, in large part, by their summer activities. The study concludes that two-thirds of the achievement gap between lower- and higher-income youth can be explained by unequal access to summer learning opportunities.

The study finds a summer learning gap that begins during elementary school. Higher-income children are more likely to have access to magazines and books and to have their parents read to them than are lower-income children. This gap accumulates over the years and, once students get to high school, it results in unequal placements in college preparatory tracks and increases the chance that children from low socio-economic families will drop out."

URL: http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/advocate/PDFS/Issue_8-7_FINAL.pdf
Posted by wrivenburgh on August 07, 2007 | Research
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