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Research,  April 03, 2007

Looking Back and Ahead After a Decade of Upheaval in Educational Technology

"The tenth edition of Technology Counts from Education Week is now online. Technology Counts 2007 grades states on leadership in educational technology, and finds wide variation among them in the core areas of access, use, and capacity. Also included is an interactive timeline that examines key educational technology trends over the past 10 years. The use that students and educators are making of digital technology has moved in new directions. Students are taking more tests on computers. And educators are making ever-greater use of digital data on student achievement -- principally standardized-test scores, but also other student work organized in digital portfolios -- to make decisions about instruction. Much of that data analysis is being driven by test-based accountability, but not all. The Editorial Projects in Education Research Center now finds that, unlike 10 years ago, most states have technology standards for students and educators, for example. But few states test to see if those standards are being met, so the degree to which schools are reaching them is unknown. Anecdotal evidence and research suggest that teachers’ integration of digital tools into instruction is sporadic. Many young people’s reliance on digital technology in their outside lives stands in sharp contrast to their limited use of it in school. Large gaps, though, have emerged in students’ use of computers at home based on their demographic backgrounds. So while disadvantaged students now have nearly as broad access to computers in schools as their more advantaged peers, at home they typically have much less."

URL: http://www.edweek.org/ew/toc/2007/03/29/index.html
Referred by: PEN Weekly NewsBlast
Posted by wrivenburgh on April 03, 2007 | Research
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