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News,  May 23, 2006

Summit focuses on encouraging girls in math, science

"Education Secretary calls for strategies to close the gender gap in technical fields"

(Update) "At a summit co-hosted by the U.S. Department of Education and the National Science Foundation, participants discussed the reasons girls are underrepresented in math and science careers--and what educators can do to change that. The issue has important implications for the nation's global competitiveness, at least one participant said."

May 17, 2006"Low participation in math and science activities by girls is keeping them from achieving their full potential and is weakening the nation's ability to compete, Education Secretary Margaret Spellings said May 15 at the first annual National Summit on the Advancement of Girls in Math and Science. 'We need definitive insights into what goes wrong, when, and why,' Spellings said. She asked her department's Institute of Education Sciences to review existing research and determine why girls are not as well represented in the sciences as boys...

Speakers at the meeting noted that women have been the driving force behind economic growth over the past several decades. Yet, government data show that girls fall behind boys in math and science as they progress through school."

URL: http://www.eschoolnews.com/news/showStory.cfm?ArticleID=6308
Referred by: eSchool News This Week
Posted by wrivenburgh on May 23, 2006 | News
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